7 Reason why every Kid should learn coding and its importance for kids

7 The reason why every kid should l

Learn coding and its importance for kids

Coding encourages and develops creativity.

By experimenting in coding children learn and strengthen their brains. Even when they make a mistake they learn. Children can be creative and creativity is encouraged. Creativity is part of the process and not always the product.

Children learning code will need to take a vague idea and use their creativity to turn it something effective. If the first solution doesn’t work, they try another one. If that one doesn’t work, they try again until the problem is solved. Coding helps to develop this way of thinking and these types of thinking skills are highly sought after.

Coding helps children with Math skills.

Coding helps children to be able to visualize abstract concepts, lets them apply math to real-world situations and makes math fun and creative. Coding is present in many of today’s STEM programs.

Learning to program involves many skills including organizing and analyzing data. Children can grow their math skills while coding, without even realizing it. Using their logic and calculation skills while creating something of their own can make maths more engaging and fun. Another big reason coding should be taught in schools.

Coders are in high demand

As mentioned, according to Code.org, 71% of all new STEM jobs are in computing, yet only 8% of STEM graduates are in Computer Science. That’s a SERIOUS shortage of CS majors.

Learning to code will increase your child’s odds of securing a lucrative STEM career, especially in a world where computing jobs are growing at over twice the national average.

Coding has quickly become a vital skill, and Code.org also points out that CS majors can earn 40% more than the college average.

With coding knowledge, students better understand the world around them

Most of us don’t know the first thing about what makes our smartphones, laptops, social media networks, and video games run. Basic programming knowledge can change the way we interact with the technologies we use (and take for granted) daily, and can open our eyes to the infinite possibilities of coding.

Coding improves problem-solving

When kids code, they take complex problems and break them down into smaller parts.

Kids learn what it’s like to approach a problem the way a software engineer does, with logical, computational thinking.

As Dan Crow, CTO of SongKick explains, “Computational thinking teaches you how to tackle large problems by breaking them down into a sequence of smaller, more manageable problems.”

This logical thinking is a powerful tool in school, work, and life.

 Coding improves persistence

Learning to code, like any new discipline, is a challenge. Thus, tackling complex problems—and making mistakes along the way—can be very frustrating.

Coding teaches the valuable skill of persistence in the face of such challenges. Learning how to problem solve and look for solutions through research and collaboration builds this highly desirable skill.

Coding improves collaboration

Every student can learn, and every student can learn how to code—kids can learn alongside others of every race, gender, or background. Kids meet and learn how to collaborate with all kinds of peers, all joined by a common interest in technology.

Classrooms and other in-person environments, like iD Tech, bring kids together for face-to-face collaboration. Kids learning online can also grow, asking each other questions, and working to solve problems and create things together.

Many games, like Minecraft, also offer a bevy of educational benefits because they too involve coding, collaboration, and participation—with peers all over the world.

 Coding improves communication

Communication is an absolutely essential skill throughout school, work, and life. People who can clearly communicate complex ideas in simple terms tend to be successful in different industries and walks of life.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *